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The Powerful Persistence of Music




Maybe for you, like me, music is the catalyst for a whole raft of memories:



These songs are encoded in my brain as exquisite memories because I was there when they created what I can only describe as an exalted moment. And I was with other people who were just as charged by the experience as I was. Live music can do that to you.


Music creates memories that can transport us immediately back to the time and place we first heard them. That's because music activates many parts of the brain, and they all kick into gear when we hear that music again.


My current trajectory to that experience passes through Red Rocks Amphitheatre in Morrison, Colo., every year around this time. If you know the place, there's no conveying the impact of sitting amid cavernous ancient rocks that cause the music to resonate as if the earth demanded it.


But the 10,000 people who are with you are indispensable to the experience. That's because the music resounds in them, too. (Full disclosure: I'll be at Red Rocks for Lord Huron, and expect to be a part of the engulfing wave triggered by members of The World Enders: Lord Huron Fan Club.)


Hearing a band live stimulates your brain's hippocampus and amygdala, but also its motor system, says Andrew E. Budson, M.D.,a professor of neurology at Boston University.


And we're not just talking about singing, swaying, and dancing together. Even heart rates can get synchronized. There is a lot of “contagiousness” in peoples' responses at live music events, researchers say.


Live concerts create community – and memories – in ways few experiences do.


And every once in a while, you've got to make sure you're alive – past, present, and beyond. Hopefully you can carry those joyful moments and memories with you into your unknown future. You never know when you might need them.


So catch some live music – rock, classical, jazz, blues, country, whatever touches your soul and reaches those lockbox regions of the brain.


You don't want to miss the epiphany.

___________________________


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8 commenti


Jim Barry
Jim Barry
07 giu

You betcha, Sharon!

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Risposta a

❤️

Mi piace

I feel privileged to have grown up in a time where, in my opinion, music was at it's best. The 60's and 70's with it's British Invation, protest songs, acid rock, folk, so many genres! For me it started at an early age with Heart Break Hotel, then on to the Beatles, the Faces, Springsteen. . . .so many others, and being able to see them all in concert was the best experience. And then to my father in law who had dementia and seemed to be happiest when listening to the music of his generation. What a gift songwriters and musicians have! My thanks to all of them. It's been a while since I've been to a live…

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Risposta a

Thanks, Kathy! They say the music you hear in your adolescent and early adult years is the music that stays with you for life. That’s a wonderful gift.

Mi piace

I shared this piece with many, Sharon. Brava.

A friend told me every year his family selects one newly released song. Then every time they drive in the car together, they play that song first. His family consists of mom, dad and young teenage son. For years now, they've had their summer song. Memories cemented with music. A way to go beyond a couple's "our song" to a family tradition.

With love & gratitude,

Susan Odgers

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Risposta a

You’re my Northern Michigan marketing team, Susan! Thank you for spreading the word.

XOSharon

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As great as all the Lord Huron albums might be; the group is even better experienced in concert! I know you and the other 10,000 fans will have a great evening at Red Rocks (two great evenings for those lucky enough to go both nights!)

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Risposta a

You're so right, Mike! We'll miss you this year, but I'm so glad you and Anna have seen the band so many times. Next year!

Mi piace
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